Legal U.S. Online Sports Betting in 2021

Legalized online sports betting became a reality in May 2018. The U.S. Supreme Court (SCOTUS) ruled in a 6-3 decision that the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) was unconstitutional. Fast forward to today, and more than 20 states, in addition to the District of Columbia, have implemented legalized sports betting in some capacity. More legal dominoes will fall, too.

In late July, the Massachusetts House of Representatives enthusiastically passed a sports betting bill (H. 3977), which has landed on the Senate steps for review. Meanwhile, proponents of a California measure to formally legalize sports betting at American Indian gaming casinos and licensed racetracks are gaining significant momentum. Taxpayers will have their say at the polls in November 2022.

Despite the prevalence of offshore entities, we are focused on reporting about legal government-regulated markets. Keep an eye on this space for in-depth coverage and consult our interactive U.S. legalization tracker map for regular updates.

U.S. legal situation: How we got here

PASPA effectively limited U.S. sports betting to Nevada, although Delaware, Montana, and Oregon carried a grandfathered clause. PASPA forbade states – outside of those exemptions above – from regulating and taxing sports betting.

New Jersey led the charge to legalize sports betting. SCOTUS recognized its decade-long crusade against the major professional sports leagues and ruled to overturn the longstanding act. The ruling by SCOTUS put an end to PASPA and gave each state the ability to enforce and implement its own legal sports betting standards and regulations.

Table of contents: state-by-state overview

Click the quick reference links to find out where sports betting is legal, states moving toward legalization, and those unlikely to act.

States with legalization: 

AL | AK | AR | AZ | CA | CO | CT | DE | DC |FL | GA | HI | ID | IL | IN | IA | KS | KY | LA | ME | MD | MA | MI | MN | MS | MO | MT | NE | NV | NH | NJ | NM | NY | NC | ND | OH | OK | OR | PA | RI | SC | SD | TN | TX | UT | VT | VA | WA | WV | WI | WY

States where sports betting is legal in 2021

Arkansas

Online: No
Retail: Yes

The Oaklawn Racing Casino Resort took the state's first legal sports bet on July 1, 2019. Two additional outlets are now authorized to operate sportsbooks either inside of their facilities or neighboring properties.

State Rep. Lee Johnson introduced HB 1942 in April 2021, which would enable casino licenses to operate “online sports pools.” This measure could expand Arkansas sports betting beyond its current retail-only presence. The Arkansas Racing Commission regulates sports betting and is considering changes to allow mobile sportsbooks. Any changes require approval by a legislative committee.

Arizona

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Legal sports betting kicked off in Arizona on Sept. 9, 2021, hours before the NFL's regular-season got underway. Seven sportsbooks are authorized to operate in the Grand Canyon State, with more on the way pending regulatory approval. Arizona’s legislation called for 20 online sports-betting licenses — 10 reserved for Native American tribes and 10 for professional sports teams.

Arizona now joins the ranks of U.S. states to offer legalized online sports betting. In April 2021, Gov. Doug Ducey signed the state's sports wagering bill into law to have retail and online betting options in place by week 1 of the 2021 NFL season. Follow the latest developments in Arizona's journey to legalization.

In August 2021, the Department of Gaming issued event wagering and daily fantasy sports licenses to FanDuel and an event wagering license to Penn National Gaming. Both were licensed as “designees” while their professional sports team and franchise partners received operator licenses. On Aug. 27, 2021, the state's gaming department issued licenses to 18 sports betting operators.

Arizona’s sports-betting licensees are sanctioned to partner with another organization to run their digital and retail sportsbooks for them. FanDuel linked up with the Phoenix Suns, and Penn partnered with Phoenix Raceway. FanDuel will launch an online sportsbook and open a retail outlet at the Footprint Center. Penn will go live with its Barstool Sportsbook platform first, followed by a retail location at the raceway.

Colorado

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Online and retail sports betting came into effect in Colorado on May 1, 2020. The passage of proposition DD, the Legalize Sports Betting with Tax Revenue for Water Projects Measure, was unanimously approved. Colorado has become a major player in U.S. sports betting, with its monthly handle surpassing $300 million on two occasions.

Delaware

Online: No
Retail: Yes

Delaware was the first state outside of Nevada to introduce regulated single-game sports betting. Gov. John Carney placed the state’s first legal single-game bet  and won his Philadelphia Phillies wager  on June 5, 2018. Three racinos now hold sports wagering licenses in the state.

Approvals for online gambling have been in place since 2013, yet the Delaware Division of Gaming Enforcement has yet to authorize online sports betting. It appears as though the regulator is taking a wait-and-see approach before allowing the racinos to launch online.

District of Columbia

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Sports wagering is legal in Washington, D.C. under Act 22-594. The legislation cleared congressional review and became law on May 3, 2019. The D.C. Lottery launched its "GameBetDC" platform in June 2020, allowing bettors in the District to wager on sports via mobile device or personal computer.

Alternatively, bets can be placed at one of two sports arenas partnered with an online sports betting company: Capital One Arena (Caesars) and Nationals Park (BetMGM). Both apps are available within a two-block radius of sports stadiums or arenas and from inside a licensed bar or restaurant.

Illinois

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

June 28, 2019, signaled the dawn of legal sports betting in Illinois. Governor J.B. Pritzker signed bill SB 690 — a lengthy 800 page-plus gaming expansion and capital bill — allowing casinos, racetracks, and sports venues like Wrigley Field to obtain licenses to operate brick-and-mortar sportsbooks.

Indiana

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Indiana's legal sports betting laws incorporate mobile and in-person wagering. Governor Eric Holcomb endorsed Indiana's sports betting bill (HB 1015) and passed it into law on May 8, 2019. Holcomb later placed the Hoosier State's first legal wager on Sept. 1, 2019. Retail sportsbooks are found in 13 Indiana casinos, while ten mobile sportsbook apps operate in the state.

Iowa

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Governor Kim Reynolds passed IA SF 617 in May 2019, paving the way for legal sports betting to officially launch in Iowa on Aug. 15, 2019. Retail sportsbooks operate within state casinos, while mobile sports wagering apps drive sign-ups and pad the monthly handle.

Michigan

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

March 11, 2020, signaled the start of legal sports betting in Michigan. This came less than three months after Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed the "Lawful Sports Betting Act" into law. Michigan sports betting offers fully remote registration, eliminating the need to visit a casino and allowing you to register, add funds, and bet from anywhere within state lines.

Mississippi

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Legal sports betting came to Mississippi on Aug. 1, 2018, with the Mississippi Gaming Commission (MGC) tasked with regulation and oversight. Bettors can leverage mobile betting capabilities; however, online wagering must take place within the grounds of a casino.

The Gaming Control Act, introduced during the state's 2019 legislative session, would have sanctioned the use of mobile sports betting apps anywhere in the state. Sen. Willie Simmons started the conversation, but other MS lawmakers were not ready to change the state's sports betting operations. Subsequently, the bill fell short on Feb. 5, 2019. In January 2020, a similar bill (MS HB 172) was introduced in the House but failed to gain traction.

Montana

Online: No
Retail: Yes

In March 2020, legal sports betting landed in Big Sky country. Governor Steve Bullock signed HB725, which revised state lottery laws to authorize sports wagering.

While Montana can tout mobile betting as a legalized activity, there is a caveat. Gov. Bullock passed on the opportunity to establish an open, competitive market in the state. The state lottery and its adopted platform, operated by Greek gaming company Intralot, were awarded the contract without a public bidding process.

Nevada

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Nevada is a mature market with legalized sports betting dating back to 1949. It was first to control sports betting, which organized crime syndicates had previously operated.

Decades of regulated sports betting experience and an established track record helped make it the gold standard for sports betting. Online sports betting is available, but bettors must first register for an account in person at a casino.

New Hampshire

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

In New Hampshire, sports betting has been legal since July 16, 2019. With the signing of bill HB 480 into law, Gov. Sununu granted the New Hampshire Lottery control over the local betting industry.

Retail and mobile sports betting is available for many sports, and betting on New Hampshire's in-state college teams is also legal. A proposed bill would expand the number of retail sportsbooks and allow them to accept live bets. It's unclear yet if the initiative has positive momentum.

DraftKings became the state's first mobile sports wagering app in December 2019, and they also launched New Hampshire's first retail sportsbook (The Brook) in August 2020.

New Jersey

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

New Jersey launched legal sports betting on June 14, 2018, becoming the second U.S. state to do so. Governor Phil Murphy placed the state's first legal sports bet at Monmouth Park. Online betting is also available, facilitated by fully remote registration, contributing to New Jersey leading the way with points of access.

Fubo Sportsbook announced a multi-faceted partnership with the New York Jets on Sept. 8, 2021. Fubo will become the NFL team's official sports betting partner sometime in 2021-22, pending regulatory approval. This agreement marks Fubo Sportsbook’s first sponsorship of a professional sports team. Details of the deal include a Fubo Sportsbook Lounge at MetLife Stadium, set to open during the 2021-22 NFL season, in addition to the team's first authorized, mobile sports betting lounge.

The Penn National Gaming owned Barstool Sportsbook officially launched in New Jersey on Aug. 24. 

New Mexico

Online: No
Retail: Yes

The Land of Enchantment was the sixth U.S. state to offer legalized sports betting. While the practice is legal in New Mexico, it is limited to a retail or an in-person experience. Lawmakers haven't passed a sports betting bill to legalize online activity within the state since the fall of PASPA.

Santa Ana Star, operated by the Pueblo of Santa Ana, took the state's first retail sports bet on Oct. 16, 2018. Additional tribal gaming centers have followed, including Hilton Buffalo Thunder Sportsbook, The Sportsbook at the Inn of the Mountain Gods, and the Isleta Resort and Casino Sportsbook. 

New York

Online: No
Retail: Yes

Despite infighting and opposition from outgoing Governor Andrew Cuomo, New York is inching towards legalizing mobile sports betting. Cuomo signed legislation for the 2022 fiscal year, including a proposal to allow online sports gambling in the Empire State.

Retail sports betting was legalized in the wake of PASPA, with the first bet placed on July 16, 2019, at the Rivers Casino in Schenectady. Despite retail betting outlets found at the state's casinos, New York loses hundreds of millions in annual gaming revenue to New Jersey and neighboring states.

On Sept. 8, 2021, the New York Jets announced a partnership with Fubo Sportsbook. Fubo is poised to become the official sports betting partner of the NFL team sometime in the fourth quarter of 2021, pending regulatory approval.

North Carolina

Online: No
Retail: Yes

Legalized yet severely restricted sports betting legislation landed in North Carolina in July 2019. Proposed changes could transform the NC landscape, as neighboring states profit significantly more from their sports betting arrangements. Currently, tribal casinos cannot allow sports betting apps outside of their establishments. If the proposed bill passes and Gov. Roy Cooper signs it into law, the North Carolina Education Lottery Commission will issue up to a dozen interactive sports wagering operator licenses.

On Aug. 19, 2021, the North Carolina Senate passed a bill to bring online sports betting to the Tar Heel State. Senate Bill 688 passed its final reading by a bipartisan vote of 26-19. The legislation heads to North Carolina’s House of Representatives for further debate.

Oregon

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Legal sports betting in Oregon resumed on Aug. 27, 2019, with the first wagers taken at the Chinook Winds Casino Resort. Oregon was one of the four states mentioned above grandfathered into PASPA. They were not required to amend the existing tribal-state agreement.

Sports betting in Oregon is currently legal via the Oregon Lottery’s ScoreBoard digital app and in-person at two tribal casinos. Governor Kate Brown has pledged her support for an attempt to overhaul sports betting in the Beaver State.

Pennsylvania

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf put his signature on a gambling expansion bill in October 2017 that later produced legalized sports gambling. The broad legislation also sanctioned online poker and Daily Fantasy Sports (DFS). Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course secured Pennsylvania's first legal sports bet in November 2018. Conversely, PlaySugarHouse became Pennsylvania's first online sportsbook to launch in June 2019.

Rhode Island

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Online sports betting has been legal in RI since its launch in September 2019. Previously, consumers had to register their sports betting account in person at one of the state's two Twin Rivers casinos.

In July 2020, Gov. Gina Raimondo put her signature on SB 2919 and HB 8097, allowing bettors to complete remote registration. Under the law, two locations can offer sports betting with the state's lottery providing regulatory oversight.

South Dakota

Online: TBD
Retail: Yes

Sports betting in South Dakota became legal with the passing of Amendment B on Nov. 3, 2020. Gov. Kristi Noem signed legislation bringing sports gambling to Deadwood. Casinos in the traditional gambling town can legally open sportsbooks. By law, that new rule also allows tribal casinos across the state to open sportsbooks.

Legalized retail sports betting came into effect on Sept. 9, 2021, in Deadwood, South Dakota. These four casinos offer sports betting: Tin Lizzie (BetMGM), Cadillac Jack’s Gaming Resort (BetMGM), Mustang Sally’s (ISI), and the Gold Dust Casino (ISI).

The state legislature approved rules for online sports betting during the 2021 session. The bill that passed prohibits online sports betting in South Dakota.

Tennessee

Online: Yes
Retail: No

Despite opposition from Gov. Bill Lee, the Volunteer State voted to authorize online sports betting in May 2019. The sticking point for Gov. Lee was the status of brick-and-mortar outlets. Tennessee's sports betting bill includes provisions for online-only sports wagering, making it one of the few states to implement an online-only program. The growing online market includes brands like DraftKings, FanDuel, BetMGM, and Tennessee Action 24/7.

According to Barstool Sports' outspoken founder, Dave Portnoy, the Barstool Sportsbook launches in Tennesse on Sept. 9, 2021.

Virginia

Online: Yes
Retail: No

The Commonwealth of Virginia legalized sports wagering in April 2020, with sports bettors placing their first bets in January 2021. Gov. Ralph Northam signed bill SB 384 into law on April 29, 2020, following several revisions in the Virginia State Legislature. The Washington Football Team of the NFL secured a sports betting license from the Virginia Lottery in 2021. That marked the first time an NFL team had obtained a wagering-related license.

Washington

Online: Coming
Retail: Yes

On March 25, 2020, Governor Jay Inslee signed sports betting Bill ESHB 2638 into law. The law permits sports wagering at Class III tribal casinos in the state. However, mobile and online wagering is only allowed when physically on-site at a licensed tribal casino. The Washington State Gambling Commission provides regulatory oversight.

On Sept. 9, 2021, the Snoqualmie Tribe became the state's first to launch retail sports betting at its Snoqualmie Casino outside Seattle. According to Stanford Le, CEO Snoqualmie Casino, the tribe will support geofenced mobile in the coming weeks. Until then, it will only accept cash wagers.

Shawn Kemp, the former Seattle SuperSonics star, placed Washington's first ceremonial bet.

West Virginia

Online: Yes
Retail: Yes

Legal and regulated sports betting was realized in West Virginia on Aug. 30, 2018. The Penn National Gaming-owned Hollywood Casino was West Virginia's first brick-and-mortar retail sportsbook. With only a handful of online sportsbooks in operation, Sen. Michael Maroney has pushed for reform, introducing modifications to SB 603 to allow bars and restaurants to accommodate online sportsbooks.

Wyoming

Online: Yes
Retail: TBD

Wyoming's mobile-only sports betting bill, signed into law by Governor Mark Gordon (R) on April 5, 2021, permits statewide mobile sports betting. An authorized sportsbook can operate an online portal without having an affiliation to a brick-and-mortar casino.

Wyoming Rep. Tom Walters introduced bill WY HB 133, nearly identical to one submitted a year earlier. The bill designates a minimum of five online sportsbooks but no cap on the total amount. Online sports betting in WY carries an age requirement of 18 years and older and permits betting on all sports. The bill was also the first to allow cryptocurrency as a valid payment method for sports betting activities. With legislation in place, the first sportsbooks could launch during the 2021-2022 NFL season. 

Sept. 1, 2021, marked the arrival of legal mobile sports betting in Wyoming. The state's gaming commission approved applications from BetMGM and DraftKings, and both launched the same day.

Coming soon: Legal sports betting in 2021

Connecticut

Online: Coming
Retail: Coming

The Connecticut legislature approved sports wagering in May 2021 through a tribal-state agreement. Governor Ned Lamont formally approved House Bill 6451, leaving the Department of the Interior to review the compact, as federal approval is pending.

The gaming bill includes provisions for mobile and retail sports betting, with the services provided by the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes and the Connecticut state lottery. With the lucrative tri-state market in play, legalized sports betting would be a significant boon for CT.

Connecticut’s three-party sports betting market is taking shape. Rush Street Interactive will join DraftKings and FanDuel in claiming the state's third and final sports betting license. Lottery officials are targetting the NFL season opener on Sept. 9 as the go-to-market launch date.

On Sept. 9, 2021, Gov. Lamont informed his constituents that the federal government has signed off on the state's plan for sports betting and online gaming.

Florida

Online: Coming
Retail: Coming

Legal mobile sports betting is coming to Florida, with the state announcing a proposed Oct. 15, 2021 launch. In conjunction with Florida's Seminole Tribe, Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a gaming pact on May 25, 2021, that would allow the Seminole Tribe to offer retail and online sports betting in the Sunshine State.

Florida's pact with the Seminole Tribe was approved by the U.S. Department of the Interior on August 6, 2021, clearing the path for retail and online sportsbooks to operate on Seminole grounds.

Pain points persist, with statewide mobile betting front and center on the docket. Industry heavyweights DraftKings Inc. and FanDuel Group are essentially frozen out of the pact, which prompted them to inject $10 million each into a proposed campaign to amend Florida’s constitution.

Louisiana

Online: Coming
Retail: Coming

Louisiana’s sports betting law puts each of the state's 64 parishes in the spotlight, with the Pelican State allowing each to decide their sports betting fate.

Regulators are eager to launch mobile and retail sports betting in Louisiana by the end of the 2021-22 NFL season. The Louisiana Gaming Control Board will oversee sports betting operations. However, the rules of the road have yet to be determined.

Maryland

Online: Coming
Retail: Coming

Through a November 2020 referendum, Maryland voters approved "sports and events betting for the primary purpose of raising revenue for education." Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan signed sports betting bill HB 940 into law in May 2021. State legislators passed a series of enabling statutes, and the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Commission approved regulations on July 15, 2021.

State lawmakers had to write and pass the rules for the industry in the 2021 legislative session. Every entity interested in Maryland sports betting, from pro sports teams and national brands to local minority and female-owned businesses, was included. Of particular note, the bill legalized up to 60 online sportsbooks to operate in Maryland.

However, regulators cannot agree on a set of rules to govern the industry. Gov. Hogan Jr. advised the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency to move quickly, but Hogan stated: “They said it’s just impossible to get it done by the start of football season.”

On Sept. 8, 2021, the Baltimore Ravens and Caesars Entertainment, Inc. announced a broad partnership with Caesars Sportsbook. The agreement further increases Horseshoe Baltimore's standing as the team's lone official casino partner. The five-year contract includes naming rights throughout the club level of M&T Bank Stadium, additional publicity through animated displays across all of the stadium's LED boards, and more.

Nebraska

Online: Coming
Retail: Coming

Through a Nov. 3, 2020 ballot, voters in the Cornhusker State legalized “all games of chance.” After further amendments to sports wagering and other gambling activities at licensed racetrack enclosures, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts signed Bill LB 561 into law.

Ohio

Online: Coming
Retail: Coming

Ohio lawmakers will strive to accelerate the progress of SB 176 this fall. Governor Mike DeWine has asserted his position that sports betting in Ohio is an inevitability. However, if betting is to launch by April 1, 2022, the earliest operators could go live, there's more work to be done.

Vermont

Online: Coming
Retail: Coming

Numerous bills targeted at legalizing sports betting in Vermont failed to pass muster but resurfaced in 2021 for further consideration. Lead sponsor Sen. Dick Sears and co-sponsors Sen. Michael Sirotkin, Sen. Christopher Pearson, and Sen. Richard Westman put forth bill S.77 which would grant the state lottery control over VT sports betting and permit up to six online operators.

Senators Sears and Sirotkin put forth a mobile-only bill in 2020, but a committee hearing was not assembled. Vermont's bordering states and even its neighbor to the north, Quebec, are in a better position to greenlight sports betting.

Wisconsin

Online: TBD
Retail: Coming

The Oneida Nation and Gov. Tony Evers announced a gaming pact in July 2021 that allows the tribe to operate retail sportsbooks at its casinos. On Friday, Aug. 20, a notice from the Federal Register indicated that approval of the amendment clears the way for the Oneida Nation to offer sports betting at their gaming properties. The Oneida Nation was the first tribe in Wisconsin to receive approval to operate a sports betting program at a retail casino. The amendment was approved by the U.S. federal government and is now in effect. Statewide mobile betting and wagering on in-state college sports have yet to be authorized.

On Sept. 2, 2021, International Game Technology (IGT) announced that its PlaySports platform would expand into Wisconsin through an agreement to power sports betting at Oneida Casino, on the Oneida Nation Reservation.

States moving toward legal sports betting

Alabama

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

Alabama lacks a lottery program, but state lawmakers advanced Senate bill SB319 to sanction a state-run lottery and implement state-wide mobile betting. In addition to the lottery, the proposed legislation calls for state racetracks to morph into casinos outfitted with retail sports betting kiosks and mobile sports betting terminals.

Passing this extensive bill is no small task, particularly for an adverse gambling state. Regardless, there's nothing new to report until these gaming options turn up on a 2022 voters ballot.

California

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

As voters head to the polls for a November 2022 referendum, California's bid to legalize sports betting hangs in the balance. A coalition of California cities recently made a significant push to legalize sports betting in the Golden State, putting forth a proposal titled the California Sports Wagering and Consumer Protection Act.

Projections from Eilers & Krejcik peg CA sports betting revenues at $503 million under the legislative amendment. Additional projections include $282 million during the first six months, factoring in license fees.

Two ongoing attempts to legalize sports betting in California are on the docket. First, a proposed tribal initiative would legalize sports wagering at land-based casinos and horse racing tracks. The legislative effort would authorize online and mobile wagering via platforms affiliated with tribal casinos and racetracks.

Georgia

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

Sports betting legislation is being discussed at all levels. However, House Bill 93 did not pass. Despite gaining approval in the Senate, Georgia's House of Representatives could not agree on a resolution pertaining to sports betting. The lack of bipartisan support was a critical blow to the Peach State's legalized sports betting efforts.

Sen. Burt Jones put forth HB 93 and there are key considerations for mobile operators seeking entry into the Georgia market. The bill requires a sportsbook to apply for a $50,000 application fee, while the annual cost for the sports betting licensing fee is pegged at $900,000. Jones’ original bill called for a 20 percent tax to be levied on sports betting companies. Regardless, local bettors will have to wait another year until further efforts to legalize sports betting are mounted.

Kansas

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

Legal wagering bills, including HB 2444, were introduced in 2020 by both the Kansas House and Senate. However, the legislative sessions were cut short due to the pandemic and lawmakers will have to put forth a new bill in 2022.

The idea of legal sports betting is gaining traction in Kansas. Positive momentum could result in retail betting first, with online betting on the backburner.

Kentucky

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

Kentucky's wait for legal sports betting continues until 2022 or longer. Key sports betting legislation cleared legislative hurdles in 2020-21 when a bill championed by Rep. Adam Koenig (R) cleared a House committee without opposition. KY was on the verge of becoming a clear favorite to legalize operations. However, the pandemic and a break from bipartisan support left Kentucky sports betting in limbo.

House Bill 241 is comparable to Koenig's earlier sponsored legislation. Details include the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission would regulate the allowance of sports wagering at Kentucky tracks and betting. State racetracks would be eligible to receive licenses to host sports wagering and professional sports venues with seating for 50,000 or more people.

Maine

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

Maine failed again to pass sports betting into law. The state Senate, citing issues that revolved around tying sports betting to retail casinos, has pushed the opportunity to 2022.

In 2019, Governor Janet Mills famously vetoed bill LD 553 (SP 175), designated as "An Act to Ensure Proper Oversight of Sports Betting in the State." Furthermore, the Senate blocked the bill at the 11th hour back in 2020.

Massachusetts

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

Ongoing efforts to legalize sports betting in Massachusetts are gaining momentum. In July 2021, the House passed sports betting bill H 3977 by an overwhelming margin of 156-3. The debate whether wagers on college sports are included in the rollout is a sticking point between the House and the Senate.

Previously, the House supported bill H.4887, which included mobile and retail sports betting provisions. However, the Senate took issue with adding specific sports betting language in its version.

Meanwhile, Sen. Eric Lesser has put forth S 269 with revised language. Both bills call for mobile and retail sportsbooks. The state's 2021 legislative session runs through mid-November, raising the prospect of a resolution and rollout during the lucrative NFL season.

Missouri

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

Missouri Sen. Denny Hoskins has been leading the state's charge to add legal sports betting since May 2018, when the Supreme Court gave each state the power to legalize. Republican leadership within the GOP-controlled legislature championed the sentiment and substance of SB256 but balked when video lottery terminals (VLT) came into the conversation.

Time is not on Missouri's side. With their legal sports betting platforms in place, neighboring Iowa and Illinois contribute to the Show-Me State's eroding market share.

Oklahoma

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

In April 2020, Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt agreed with two federally recognized tribes on gaming compacts covering sports betting. The Department of the Interior approved the agreements on June 8, 2020, which paved the way for sports betting to begin in Oklahoma. However, opposition to sports betting expansion from state lawmakers and Oklahoma's Attorney General has created more uncertainty.

Texas

Online: TBD
Retail: TBD

The Sports Betting Alliance, a consortium of Texas-based professional sports teams, is backing a new bill to bring legal online and retail sports betting to the Lone Star state. Despite its support for personal freedoms, the conservative state has historically shunned gambling in all forms.

Once considered an unlikely candidate to adopt sports betting legislation, changing demographics and investments by outside interests have revived efforts in Texas. Details of the recently drafted sports betting bill are scarce. However, the Dallas Morning News reports that adults 21-years of age and older, physically located within state lines, can wager on professional and college sports -- both online and in-person.

If the bill passes, members of the Sports Betting Alliance could link up with sportsbook operators to offer online betting platforms and brick-and-mortar retail outlets. State lawmakers missed the opportunity to bring sports betting to Texas in 2021, but there's now a bullseye on tabling legalization in 2023.

States unlikely to legalize sports betting

Alaska

Online: No
Retail: No

The 49th state to join the union may if ever, become the "Last Frontier" to legalize sports betting. Alaska is considered an extreme longshot to legislate and formally legalize sports wagering.

Hawaii

Online: No
Retail: No

Hawaii is one of just two states, Utah being the other, with no legal gambling provisions. As such, sports betting legislation is unlikely to receive a lei greeting in the Aloha State.

Idaho

Online: No
Retail: No

Current state laws do not look favorably upon gambling, with horse racing the lone exception. Little to no movement from Idaho lawmakers suggests no momentum or appetite for legal sports betting.

Minnesota

Online: No
Retail: No

State lawmakers have contemplated legal sports betting bills, including HF767. Still, Minnesota has not hammered out how it would operate and which stakeholders, particularly Minnesota Native American tribes, would be authorized to accept wagers.

North Dakota

Online: No
Retail: No

In March 2021, North Dakota lawmakers spiked a sports betting (ND 3032) ballot measure. Amendments to the state constitution’s sports wagering prohibitions would have resulted in a 2022 ballot referendum. The latest sports betting blow likely dashes hopes for legalization until 2025 or later.

South Carolina

Online: No
Retail: No

Nearly every form of gambling is banned in the Palmetto State, and sports betting is no exception. Section 16-19-10 of the South Carolina Code of Laws states that any form of lottery or game of chance, either public or private, cannot be established and is forbidden. It's unlikely that South Carolina and its conservative legislature will consider its first major gaming expansion since 2002.

Utah

Online: No
Retail: No

Utah is highly doubtful to adopt legalized sports betting, particularly since its anti-gambling position is written into the state constitution. Decades of opposition make any changes to its policy toward gambling unlikely and would signify a massive departure.

Safest sports betting sites in 2021

The sheer proliferation of legalized U.S. sports betting markets has created a lucrative and competitive market. While competition is a boon to consumers and a significant boost for state revenues, the variance between sports betting sites and sportsbooks creates uncertainty.

Our sports betting experts have scoured the web and taken the time to research, review, and test close to 200 online sportsbooks. The result: We have identified the safest online sports betting sites. The most trustworthy and legit sports betting sites are listed here:

BetMGM

BetMGM is the sportsbook platform of MGM Resorts International, an influential name in the hospitality and gaming sector. BetMGM hol

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