Industry beat: Americans are gambling more than ever

If you follow the gambling industry closely, you know the American Gaming Association has made some major moves recently.

Longtime head of the AGA Frank Fahrenkopf announced his retirement earlier this year and his No. 2, Judy Patterson, resigned last week. That has paved the way for new CEO Geoff Freeman, who made a splash with his first speech on a major platform at the G2E conference in Las Vegas in late September.

Freeman is promising a more progressive AGA that plans to embrace the digital era of gambling.   

“We are not against regulation. We have never been against regulation. We want regulation,” he said.

According to a press release from the AGA, "Freeman called for a more modernized system of regulation, one that allows the industry to thrive in a new era of growth – an era Freeman says will be 'defined at the intersection of digital technology and social media.'”

Hopefully we'll also see sports betting take on a more prominent role with the AGA with New Jersey immersed in its court battle to legalize it there.

England wins, UK betting shops rejoice


Sportsbooks in the UK were thrilled to see England beat Poland 2-0 earlier this week. The win confirmed England's slot in the World Cup in 2014 and EGaming Review reports that's worth at least £20 million to betting shops in the UK.

Simon Clare, Coral director of communications, said: “Turnover on a World Cup will be in the region of £250m on the high street, and over £100m online and mobile - but if England had failed to qualify that would have seen turnover reduced by circa 20%.”

Other quick-hitters:

- Americans are gambling more than ever according to this report by Time Business & Money.

- In this interview from New York Magazine, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia says Supreme Court judges like to bet on how long the State of the Union address would be. Good sign for New Jersey, perhaps?

- Here's a great column by Brian Tuohy of Sports On Earth on why sports betting should be legal.

- An estimate reported by the BBC says sports betting could be at $1 trillion world wide.

- The EU is looking at anti money laundering policies that could cost gambling shops a fortune.
  

If you have any feedback or suggestions for our Editorial Team, please contact us at Editorial

            share   SHARE   rss   RSS FEED   email   EMAIL   print   PRINT

There haven't been any comments posted on this article. Be the first to respond!

You are currently not logged in.
Login | Signup | Help
You must be logged in to post a comment.

Top Response

There have been no comments on this article. Be the first to respond!