Three sneaky ways to maximize your MLB daily fantasy at-bats

Aug 10, 2017 |
Three sneaky ways to maximize your MLB daily fantasy at-bats
While home teams will often bat just eight times in a nine-inning game, road teams always get at least nine innings worth of at-bats in a regulation game.
Photo By - USA Today Images
While home teams will often bat just eight times in a nine-inning game, road teams always get at least nine innings worth of at-bats in a regulation game.
Photo By - USA Today Images

The great thing about daily fantasy lineups, as opposed to season-long configurations, is that you only need to concern yourself with counting stats - no batting average or OBP to worry about here.

That means that maximizing your at-bats is the quickest and easiest way to give yourself a leg up on the competition. And while not all at-bats are created equal - you would almost always take three Aaron Judge plate appearances over five Alcides Escobar at-bats - it does stand to reason that, the more your players stroll up to the plate, the better off you'll be.

Here are four ways you can maximize your at-bat count in both cash game and tournament play, aside from the obvious "choose players at the top of the batting order" tip that the majority of daily fantasy players already employ:

Opt for the Road Side

While home teams will often bat just eight times in a nine-inning game (since home teams win roughly 54 percent of the time, and don't get to bat if they're leading after 8 1/2 innings), road teams always get at least nine innings worth of at-bats in a regulation game. It might not seem like a big difference, but it can be just what you need to push your point total into cash range.

Bear in mind, however, that while selecting road hitters does give you more at-bats on average, those plate appearances aren't necessarily going to bear fruit; the majority of pitchers have stronger home splits than road totals, and a whole lot of those ninth-inning at-bats are coming against lockdown closers. Still, this is an effective way to rack up more at-bats.

Avoid Platoon Options

Some major-league starting position players find themselves in a platoon situation - and even if those hitters are on the strong side of the pairing, they'll often find themselves replaced in late-game situations when the opposing team brings in an opposite-handed reliever. And when that happens, you can say goodbye to those pivotal late-contest at-bats.

When choosing between two players of similar skill set or expected production, opt for the one less likely to be replaced in the latter stages of the game. Even though the majority of batters don't fare nearly as well against same-handed pitchers, the fact that they'll still be given a chance to hit despite these shortcomings can only mean good things for your overall at-bat total.

Pick on Poor Pitchers

You're always looking for soft pitching matchups to exploit - but while it's easy to slot in a team's big boppers against a mediocre starting pitcher, it takes more guts to load up on hitters that don't have the same upside as their hard-hitting teammates. And this is where you can really pile up the plate appearances without spending a mint.

Seek out any players in this situation, even if they don't hit a bunch of home runs. The Howie Kendricks, Cory Spangenbergs and Freddy Galvises of the world can win you thousands of daily fantasy dollars simply by virtue of hitting high in a lineup that is expected to score a lot of runs; any time you get a shot at six at-bats in a game from a single player, you have to take it.


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